The Finnish lion and the German eagle

A bit of a fun entry!

I don’t know what’s up with YouTube’s algorithm, but it keeps recommending Finnish-themed videos to me these days. For example another treatise on Lauri Törni. Since the video was only posted about a month ago, I had the – granted, very small – hope that some of my research on Törni’s time in Germany might have gone into it. But no, it was the same old, same old.
However, since I also keep getting recommended a video by Military History not Visualized with the German eagle in its thumbnail, I remembered something that I wrote, oh, back in May 2021 on my second blog. And since it dealt with both of those topics, here it is in translation. I still think it’s sweet.

In the fall 1940 the German Eagle took the Finnish Lion – still weak from the Winter War battles – under her wing.
(Kari Kallonen:
Lauri Törni – albumi / Larry Thorne – The Album*)

That is a sweet depiction and I thank the author very much for it. I only wish that the German government of the time had actually acted out of reasons of charity and friendship between peoples, or simply decency, and not out of self-interest. That’s actually what annoys me the most about the whole story – what the German people could and should have been, and what they made of themselves instead! (In Jägerblatt I recently read about the allied Finnish and German air forces, a very touching episode.)

But I notice that of all this imagery, one thing has struck me the most: our good old Reichsadler is a she-eagle! I like that. And I will stick to it in the future.

For the non-German, non-Finnish speaking crowd (the latter of which I belong to**): „Adler“ is a male noun in German, „kotka“ appears to me to be a female noun in Finnish – please correct me if I’m wrong. It explains the use of the female possessive pronoun by Kallonen.

I leave you with a picture that I discovered in a video by Visit Kemijärvi that always makes me smile (click on it to enlarge):

Kids and soldiers. They always seem to get along, don’t they? Must be a universal thing.


* If you have any interest in Törni, get this book. I’m not even kidding. It’s one of my favourites in my collection.

** Well, I know a few words and a bit of grammar, but not enough to get me anywhere. For some strange reason, „matkatavarat“ (luggage) has stuck in my mind faithfully for years now.

Voices from the past: Schloss Itter (again)

Voices from the not so distant past in this case, but I’m finding a lot of tidbits at the moment that I don’t think have been mentioned anywhere else before.

Recently, a reader of this blog asked whether I knew anything about the fate of Gangl’s men after the events of Schloss Itter. Well, I’ve now started looking into it – it’s as yet unclear how much I can find out. One of them, Lt. Josef Wegscheider, became quite an important man in Wörgl, a tradition which the Wegscheider/Mayr descendants still uphold to this day (just Goggle it. I was intimidated right away). But there is actually a story:

„In the autumn of 1944, my father Josef Wegscheider and Sepp Gangl saw the Dachau concentration camp and were shocked,“ [Alois] Wegscheider said about their motivation to join the resistance.
(https://www.kitzanzeiger.at/Letzte-Schlacht-um-Schloss-Itter_pid,17070,nid,59826,type,newsdetail.html)

And then there’s an interesting article on a regional website:

It towers mightily up there at the entrance to the Brixen Valley with its thick walls, battlements and towers. We all, or almost all, know Castle Itter from driving by and have looked up there. But hardly any of us have ever entered it. It has been privately owned for decades and is not open to the public. The castle, which is surrounded by many myths, legends and rumours, seems all the more mysterious. We spoke to someone who went in and out of there as a matter of course many years ago.

Hans Fuchs, the „Litzl farmer“ in Itter, was mayor of the small community at the time. He had frequent dealings with Wilhelm Woldrich, the owner of the castle in those days. We sit in the farmhouse parlour at his home. Hans has prepared written documents, photos and newspaper articles, and more importantly, he has a whole head full of personal experiences that connect him to Castle Itter.

In February 2018, the book „Die letzte Schlacht“ [German-language translation of The Last Battle] was presented by Andreas Wirthensohn in Itter. It describes the battle for the castle in the last days of the Second World War. Hans Fuchs was right there as a child. He tells me how he experienced the dramatic scenes. […]

The Nazis expropriated the owner and converted the castle – at that time a luxury hotel – into a branch of the Dachau concentration camp. So-called „honorary prisoners“ were held here as hostages to exert pressure on France as needed. For among the prisoners were mainly members of the French government in exile: Édouard Daladier and Paul Reynaud (both former heads of state of France), Marie-Agnès de Gaulle (sister of Charles de Gaulle), the politician and tennis star Jean Borotra, the generals Maurice Gamelin and Maxime Weygand and the former prime minister of Italy, Francesco Saverio Nitti.

Hans Fuchs has noted down all the names, just as he recorded all the events he personally experienced in writing on a few sheets of paper for himself. They are important contemporary documents. Because Hans Fuchs was 14 years old at the time, during those dramatic days in 1945 when the war ended and the famous battle for Castle Itter took place. What he experienced then is almost unimaginable today.

On 2 May 1945, camp commander Hauptsturmführer Wimmer was ordered by Heinrich Himmler to liquidate all the inmates at Castle Itter. „He didn’t do that. He told his men, so, now we have to hand over our weapons, and we have to hand them over to the French.“ But they didn’t want to take them, they didn’t want to defend themselves. They hoped for liberation. And they asked the cook to ride towards the Americans on his bicycle and fetch help. The cook himself told Hans this when he was on holiday in Itter in 1972. He had been a Dachau prisoner and was employed as a cook and caretaker at Castle Itter from 1943 to 45.

Since the prisoners did not want weapons, they [the weapons] were taken to Wörgl and handed over to the resistance movement that had formed there. The guards scattered to the four winds. „They hid their uniforms and saw to it that they got away.“ On 4 May, regiments of hastily trained, very young SS guards marched to Itter. „What’s going on,“ Hans wondered when he saw them from the window. They came to do what Wimmer had not done. That day, it was a Saturday, Hans remembers, Castle Itter was shelled. „It started snowing, cannons were firing, a few hundred men would have stormed Castle Itter.“ Hans was just near the castle „distributing horse manure“ and quickly took cover when he heard the bullets whistling.

„Major Gangl and the resistance movement from Wörgl came to the rescue because they realised that things were going so badly, and they took the side of the prisoners, repelled the attack and brought peace to the fighting.“

Gangl lost his life in the process. When hardly anything could be heard at around 3 p.m., Hans, curious as he was, had to go and have a look. Between the Gasthof Itter and the village, he watched as the Americans disarmed the SS soldiers.

After the battle

One week after the castle was liberated, the gravedigger, Hans‘ uncle – the old tailor Sepp – asked Hans to help him transport three corpses from the Barml mountain farm to the cemetery. Hans was astonished when he recognised the dead man. It was Hitler’s Leibstandartenführer of the SS, John Miller, who had been hiding on the farm for over a week.

He had shot his wife and child and slit his own wrists.

„The room looked terrible.“ After Hans had unloaded the three coffins from the cart in the cemetery, the priest came and instructed him to take the coffin of the murderer and suicide back and bury it somewhere else. He did not want it in the Christian cemetery. So Hans took it back and later helped his uncle bury the high-ranking SS officer’s coffin next to the old Sauangergatter. Hans can’t say for sure, but he thinks John Miller was related to the famous musician Glen Miller.
The bodies were exhumed years later and transferred to Germany.

What became of Wimmer?
No one knows as well as Hans: „Wimmer Wast“ had the prisoners give him a written certificate of his good conduct before the liberation and advised his 25 guards to seek refuge 2 days before the American liberation. Thanks to his good contacts with the Mühltal innkeeper, he was able to hide under a hayloft in the Grundried alpine pasture. He did not want to hand himself over to the Americans, but waited until the French came as occupiers. He must have had to present himself, but he was not imprisoned and could move around freely.
He later took a job with the biochemistry department in Kundl. Hans helped him to chauffeur the rest of his belongings to Kundl, where he found a flat, on a cart harnessed to the well-behaved horse Lora. Two years later Wimmer took his own life. His Dachau past had probably caught up with him.

(https://www.baerig.tirol/de/das-schicksals-schloss.html)


An earlier blog post on Gangl and Castle Itter here.

Blessed Father Engelmar as intercessor for Europe

Translation of a German-language article on https://www.engelmarunzeitig.de/aktuelles/nachrichten/260-seliger-pater-engelmar-als-f%C3%BCrbitter-f%C3%BCr-europa

Father Damian Weber CMM remembers: „It was in August 2007. Our confrere Christian Blouin, Bishop of Lae in Papua New Guinea, came to Rome for a visit and wished to meet the Holy Father as well. Pope Benedict XVI was already at his summer residence in Castel Gandolfo. There he granted us a private audience. This meeting ended up being an extraordinary event. And it was because of Father Engelmar Unzeitig, whose process for beatification had been going on for several years. Let me tell you:
The Pope was of course informed that Bishop Christian was accompanied by the General of the Mariannhill Missionaries. When he then shook my hand in greeting, he asked me with noticeable interest whether Father Engelmar’s process was progressing and how things were going in this respect. I was able to tell him that preparations were being made for the „Consulta Medica“ and that we were confident that a final judgement on the miracle would soon be possible. (For a beatification or canonisation, a miracle is always needed. Then, to confirm the authenticity of such a miracle, it is examined by three doctors, and must then be confirmed by at least two of them. Before the final solemn declaration, however, an additional „obstacle“ is built in, namely the „Consulta Medica“. In addition to the three from the first consultation, there are four other doctors on this panel of medical experts. This panel also has to confirm the authenticity of the miracle with a numerical majority).

In the case of Father Engelmar, two of the doctors in the first instance had no doubts about the authenticity of the miracle. We were therefore confident that the second instance would also come to the same conclusion. Pope Benedict XVI was visibly relieved by my answer and then said, with visible and palpable excitement: „We need Father Engelmar as an intercessor for Europe. He knows Europe’s fragility from experience, and as a missionary he also knows what Europe needs.“

However, the Consulta Medica did not end as we had hoped. On the basis of insightful arguments, all seven decided unanimously that the „miracle“ could also be explained naturally. When I then wanted to report this result to Pope Benedict XVI, I was surprised to see that he had already been informed about it. His reaction was clear and firm: Now you have to reopen the trial, and you have to do it for a martyr. We followed this advice and on 24 September 2016 we were able to celebrate the beautiful feast of Father Engelmar’s beatification in Würzburg.

In these days when we are asking ourselves what is to happen to Europe, not only in connection with Ukraine and the indescribable misery of countless innocent people, Pope Benedict’s words came back to me with force.“

Blogserien – ein Überblick / Blog series – an overview

Weil es inzwischen leicht ist, die Übersicht zu verlieren, eine Aufstellung meiner Blogserien und ihrer Beiträge nach heutigem Stand. / Because it’s easy to lose track by now, a list of my blog series and their posts as of today.

The life and times of Marta Dietschy-Hillers

Introduction
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4: The characters and places in „A Woman in Berlin“
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Recommendations for further reading and watching

Lauri Törni in Germany 1945

Introduction
Part 1
Outtake: Felix Steiner
Outtake: The Goliath POW camp
Part 2
Part 3
Outtake: Odds and loose ends
Outtake: Riikka Ojanperä, and a visit from the beyond

Voices from the past

Humanity in war – Part 1 (Velesmes)
Humanity in war – Part 2 (Ukraine)
Humanity in war – Part 3 (Oosterbeek, „Market Garden“)
Humanity in war – Part 4 (Soviet captivity)
Christmas 1915 (The Richthofen family)
A Christian in captivity – Part 1 (Walter Ohler)
A Christian in captivity – Part 2 (Walter Ohler)
A Christian in captivity – Part 3 (Josef Seuffert)
A Christian in captivity – Part 4 (Josef Seuffert)
A Christian in captivity – Part 5 (Josef Seuffert)
Germans as captives of the Western Allies – Part 1
Germans as captives of the Western Allies – Part 2 (Christians)
Through the inferno of Halbe (Günter Adam, Waffen-SS)
Clergy to the rescue
The last days before the occupation – Part 1 (Uslar)
The last days before the occupation – Part 2 (Uslar)
In captivity (Günter Adam, Waffen-SS)
My encounter with US killers (Günter Adam, Waffen-SS)
A little Lebensborn story (Günter Adam, Waffen-SS)
“This Major is okay…” (Josef Gangl, Schloß Itter)

Jolanthe Marès – Die Schriftstellerin von Berlin W (German-language only)

Teil 1
Teil 2 (Themen und Bezüge)
Teil 3
Teil 4
Teil 5
Teil 6 (Frauenbilder, Männererwartungen in Verschenktes Leben und Die Sünderin)
Teil 7 (Starke Frauen im Berlin der Weimarer Republik: Dela Steinthal, Inge – seine Frau und Die Männer um Sibylle Wengler)
Teil 8 (Anders, aber nicht zwangsläufig schlechter: Die Frauen in Die Mausefalle Liebe)
Teil 9 (Szenen dreier Ehen: Sonja Holms Ehe, Unsterbliche Liebe und Meine Frau und ich)
Teil 10 (Ausgewählte Bibliographie)

Common misconceptions

Rumours, exaggerations, and misunderstandings
The Red Baron’s (alleged) last words
Arguing with ignorance
Don’t believe Goebbels‘ propaganda
A little Lebensborn story (also part of the series Voices from the past)

The Irlmaier prophecies

Part 1: The seer
Part 2: The signs
Part 3: The Third World War
Part 4: The yellow line and the three days of darkness
Part 5: The aftermath
Part 6: The Kurier text

Besuch bei einem guten Mann / Visiting a good man

Mit nur zwei Jahren Verspätung dank bösem C stattete ich endlich den lange geplanten Besuch in Erlangen ab – am Grab von Heinrich Franke. Neben Franz Stock gehört er eindeutig zu den zwei besten Menschen, die ich im Zuge von Recherchen kennenlernen durfte, und ich danke Lorraine Tinsley dafür, mich auf seine Spur gebracht zu haben.
Das Grab wird gepflegt, vermutlich von der Stadt Erlangen, deren Ehrenbürger er ist. Aber ich bezweifle, daß noch viele Menschen dort wissen, warum er Ehrenbürger wurde und welch bemerkenswertes Leben er geführt hat.

With only two years delay thanks to the evil C, I finally paid the long-planned visit to Erlangen – to Heinrich Franke’s grave. Together with Franz Stock, he is one of the two best people I have had the honour of meeting in the course of research, and I thank Lorraine Tinsley for putting me on his trail. The grave is maintained, presumably by the city of Erlangen, of which he is an honorary citizen. But I doubt that many people there still know why he became an honorary citizen and what a remarkable life he led.

The Irlmaier prophecies, Part 6: The Kurier text

(Quoted from: Stephan Berndt, Alois Irlmaier – Ein Mann sagt, was er sieht)

On the evening of 28 March 2002, a prophecy text allegedly by Alois Irlmaier appeared in a German-language internet forum – subsequently called „Kurier-Text“. The Kurier text is said to date from 12 October 1945 and predicts, among other things, 11 September 2001 – or rather it sounds very much like it:

America will assassinate their own presidents…
I see the skyscrapers collapsing.
America will wage war in the East all the time and never again win.

Publishing this prediction only 1/2 a year after September 11, 2001 is – well – let’s say quite unfortunate
For a few days, some people from the forum occupied themselves with the text. Since the forum had a different thematic focus, the text was quickly forgotten again. Quite some time later – in spring 2006 – another internet forum got wind of the text. One of the main topics of this forum was prophecies about the future of Europe and the world, so the prophecy text was examined more closely. People who were well acquainted with Alois Irlmaier also took part in the discussion on the internet. After a thorough discussion of the text, the impression that it was genuine and really came from Alois Irlmaier became stronger – although there were also doubts. […]

As great as the need is now [he speaks from the perspective of October 1945, C.S.], so great will be the abundance in 20 years.
Lard and butter will spoil, bread will be discarded, as will be the sausages. The grocers stand under the door and call, buy something.
The rivers will be taken from their beds, because their strength will be needed for a while.
People will become more and more arrogant and want to take all honour from the Lord God. For example false stars will be pushed under the real ones. Young people will have to hold fast to their hearts so that they are not robbed of them for money.
The great ones of the world will change quickly. A holy pope will pass briefly over the earth. They will want to break through all order.
An iron fence will go through Germany, right through the middle, whoever comes to it will die.
Everyone in the West will be disobedient to God, the bishops will quarrel among themselves and with the Pope. The clergy will go to the dogs in many cases. In the East, much martyr’s blood will flow and much, much prayer will be said in the cellar; many will kneel in the cellar and pray whom they consider an enemy of the faith.
Prague will have to go through a lot, like the Hungarians. But Prague will disappear completely in smoke and flames.
Roads will be built and every apprentice will have a car. The petrol, the oil will be sucked out of the earth, so it will be dry and cracked inside. I see many earthquakes.
The devil will create whole governments.
Pray, keep the commandments, God is near. On a day like any other I hear his step…
America will assassinate their own presidents. The blacks will get the power who have been in the dust for so long. Immorality, crime will be called originality over there. I see the skyscrapers collapsing. America will wage war in the East all the time and never again win. God has turned away.
Russia’s people are always praying for change, Beelzebub is moving to China.
People will visit all the planets to say God does not live there. But the planets spit them out. For it looks there like the world before God made it.
The Redjackets come over Bohemia, into Europe. Three armies meet in western Germany. They come at intervals from the East. There they stand man to man.
First the city with the iron tower will set itself on fire and revolt with the youth. The trouble goes round the world.
At Aachen is the greatest battle in the history of the world. The soil in West Germany is burnt 10 metres deep by a force. From the sands of the African desert the great birds rise with eggs of death without men.
A robber prince in the south will go against Russia and do great damage.
The Mother of God will come often and warn.
Plagues will be that no one knows and can help.
In Asia, in India and Latin America there will be famine without bounds, people will be exterminated by a foreign power.
Many good leaders will be murdered until the war, for only God wins.
England will be punished for everything. I see a big black box, there is no one inside, then fire, then smoke, and it was England.
The famine will be terrible, but not long. See that your windows and doors close well, for you cannot let your best friend in, or the poisonous smoke and breath will come in. The dead will lie in heaps in the streets. The barns will be empty and the cattle will roar because no one waters them.
On a freezing night thunder will sound, then close door and window, it will remain dark for 3 days as in the deepest night, the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Have a consecrated light at hand. The old and the terminally ill will regain their health if they have complied with God, the others will die.
Now all is destroyed by the bombs [again, from the perspective of 1945, C.S.], then towards the end, the new houses will spring up like mushrooms, but they will all be empty, it will be teeming with young devils whom they call children.
Go straight the way, when America…

Here the prophecy text ends abruptly.

[Stephan Berndt goes on to examine the history of the text and the evidence for or against its veracity. C.S.]


Part 1: The seer
Part 2: The signs
Part 3: The Third World War
Part 4: The yellow line and the three days of darkness
Part 5: The aftermath

The Irlmaier prophecies, Part 5: The aftermath

(Quoted from: Stephan Berndt, Alois Irlmaier – Ein Mann sagt, was er sieht)

According to A. Schönhammer (1997), Irlmaier is said to have advised a woman to leave Neustadt an der Donau because it would „go up in flames“. The woman should flee to relatives in Freising.

„No, you don’t need to worry over there in the Allgäu and on the Lech. It won’t do you much good either, only large numbers of refugees will come and your own people will steal and plunder so much that it will be a disgrace.

Munich gets it a little bit, … You (about 20 km south of Munich) get a lot of people here. Refugees. … You have to have food and water for three weeks. The mess lasts three weeks (anarchy in the Munich area from the beginning of the war). … When it starts, fill the bathtub with water right away, use buckets… fill everything with water. Because you won’t have a chance to get water for three weeks, (because) the electricity is out. There is no more water. … Don’t go out when it starts. You mustn’t leave the house for three weeks. … they (the looters) take the cattle out of the stable, and if the farmer resists, they beat him to death. The townspeople come to the countryside, they are ruthless.

„The Lady of Altötting spreads her mantle over the ‚Saurüssel‘. No one comes here.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 92

But the Rupertiwinkel is spared. And you can walk for days until one person meets another.

Zukunft des Abendlandes?, 1986, p. 186

Around Landau, supposedly, „everything is yellow and destroyed.“

Alois Irlmaier, 1990, p. 147

Irlmaier always said at home [southern Chiemgau] that many Austrians would flee to us and that the Salzburg motorway would be totally jammed.

Statement from 2008, from an acquaintance of mine whose family is a neighbour of the Irlmaiers.

„… I see a bunch of soldiers coming from the Chiemgau into Salzburg. The people are all yellow, you think they’re Chinese, but they’re not. They don’t kill anyone any more, they just steal, yes, they steal what they need for their lives…“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

The whole area east of Linz will become one big desert, but here in the south and west there is nothing to fear.

Münchner Merkur, 18 October 1949, p. 4

„After the great war comes mass death and famine, and then come the floods.“

„The famine will be terrible, but not long.“

Regarding the duration of the famine, surprisingly Irlmaier makes a statement that is completely out of the ordinary. Conrad Adlmaier writes in connection with the three days of darkness:

„… When asked what people should do to survive the great darkness and cosmic* dust, the seer replied, „Buy some soldered tin cans of rice and pulses. Bread and flour keep, moist things spoil, like meat, except in tin tins. Water from the tap is edible, but not milk. People will not be very hungry during the catastrophe and darkness…“.

*the „cosmic“ might be an interpretation by Adlmaier

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 106, 110

„One day riots will break out in the cities, then there will be stealing and looting. The townspeople come into the countryside and want to take the farmers‘ cattle, then the farmer has to sit down firmly on his things, otherwise they will steal his shirt out from under him. But this evil time passes quickly. And after that comes a good time.“

Traunsteiner Nachrichten, 31 December 1949, p. 9

Two large groups of people still come across the Danube and save themselves with us, but the third group of people no longer comes across, a ring closes around them. None of them stay alive. …
There are so many people living south of the Danube that there is not enough for anyone. Hunger drives the townspeople to the countryside, where they get what they need … There is a lot of theft and looting.“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

But then the Pope will return and he will crown three more kings, the Hungarian, the Austrian and the Bavarian. He is very old and has snow-white hair, wears lederhosen and goes among the people like his own kind.
At first there is still famine, but then so much food comes up the Danube that everyone is fed. The surplus people move to where the desert has been created and everyone can settle where they want and have as much land as they can grow. Then the people become few and the grocer stands at the door and says: „Buy something from me, otherwise I’ll die.“ And the sausages hang over the rim of the plate, that’s how much there is.

Blick in die Zukunft, 1950, p. 38

„The Pope, who had to take refuge across the water for a short time while the high clergy were being murdered ’nastily‘ in droves, returns after a short time. Flowers bloom in the meadows, then he comes back.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 94

„The Pope leaves his city and goes west, where there is a big church by the big water, and when he comes back, only six of his people are still there, because things are chaotic there too.“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

„I see the Holy Father in a city by the river, with a high church, crowning our king.“

Münchner Allgemeine, 20 November 1949, supplement Bayerische Heimat, p. 9

The ideal cast for „city on the river“ and „high church“ is: Cologne! You won’t find a bigger church on a bigger river anywhere in Europe. The Pope is fleeing to Cologne! Why Cologne? Is the Pope German? … I must admit that in the 2009 edition of this book I could not resist the temptation to interpret this in terms of Benedict XVI. Unfortunately, the latter then unexpectedly resigned from his office on 28 February 2013. Officially, Benedict XVI is now considered Pope Emeritus, but is still addressed as „Holy Father“ or „Your Holiness“.
Accordingly, we currently (2014) have two popes: one in office and one emeritus. In the history of popes, there has only been one other pope besides Benedict XVI who voluntarily resigned: Pope Coelestine V (1204). And what about popes who became pope several times? Were there also such popes? Yes, but only one. And by chance his name was Benedict IX. He was Pope twice between 1032 and 1048.

„… and then we will have a free hand again in our homeland. Golden times will come to us. Three crowns I see clearly that will reign in the fear of God. The Danube monarchy will be ours. All over again it will start and people will live again in reverence and trust in God, as it should be.“

Tatsachenberichte um Alois Irlmaier, 1952, p. 22

„But people have to start again where their great-great-grandfathers started.“

Alois Irlmaier, 1990, p. 153

„I see steamers moving along from down the Danube, very black clouds rising from the chimney to the sky, they bring more than enough things. And the peasants carry full panniers; they bring things into town because they have so much and can’t get rid of it at all …“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

The Sonderpost from Konstanz on Lake Constance had interviewed Irlmaier according to its own information and reproduces it:

… in a town north of the Danube two crevices will open up in the ground through which mankind will come across treasures that have been hidden for centuries and which will help us get over the difficult times.

„But there will be a good time later, also we will get a different climate. There will be no more winter here and there grows more than enough.“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

„I see vineyards and southern fruits growing here in later times, believe it or not.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1950, p 39 and 54

With regard to the time after the war, the Allgäu witness recalled the following Irlmaier statement:

Afterwards comes a lovely peaceful time. The people are poor, but happy and joyful. Everyone is allowed to have as much land as he can work with his hands. We can live in the houses as we like.

„… at the same time violent tremors shake the earth and a new land appears from the ocean that was there before.“

Gesammelte Prophezeiungen, 1959, p. 185

„Our young people still have to enlist, volunteers still get involved in the fighting, the others have to go away to the occupation and will stay there for three summers until they come home again. Then there will be peace and I see Christmas trees burning.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 92

A nation in the West gets the biggest revolution of all time…

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

But then the Pope will come back and he will crown three more kings, the Hungarian, the Austrian and the Bavarian. That one is very old and has snow-white hair, he wears lederhosen and goes among the people like his own kind.

Blick in die Zukunft, 1 February 1950, p. 38

I see the monarch standing there, back there in the corner. He is an old, grey and gaunt man. He is being crowned by the Pope, because he is coming back.

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

After victory, an emperor is crowned by the fleeing pope and then peace comes.

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 110

„Then there will be peace and good times. Three crowns I see flashing and a gaunt old man will be our king. An ancient crown in the south will also be restored to honour. … The Pope, who did not have to flee across the water for long, returns. Flowers bloom in the meadows, and he returns to mourn his murdered brothers. … After these events comes a long, happy time. Whoever experiences it may count themselves lucky.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 114

„Through the prayer of Christianity, the monster from hell dies, even the young people believe again in the intercession of Our Lady.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 113

„But once the cross reigns again, and it will reign everywhere, then everything will be better again. Our fatherland will also see better times again. But first the worst must be gotten through, there’s nothing to be done about it. There will be a great famine, and people will beg, even those who are doing quite well today. Many people will come from the Bohemian Forest to ask for help. … The people will all get along well and you will hardly hear a bad word anymore.“

Altbayerische Heimatpost, 20 November 1949, p. 8

One would then have much less money and laws, it would be a free, better life.

Münchner Allgemeine, 20 November 1949, p. 9

„Irlmaier expressed to my father that there were a great many natural resources in Bavaria, that he could see them quite clearly beneath the ground, but that he would not reveal anything, because it would be better if they remained there until Bavaria was independent again, which he obviously believed in.“

Alois Irlmaier, 1990, p. 99

The laws that bring death to the children become invalid after the cleansing.

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 113

This refers to the abortion paragraph § 218, which made abortions within certain time limits legal in Germany from mid-1974. When Irlmaier was alive, abortions were still illegal!


Part 1: The seer
Part 2: The signs
Part 3: The Third World War
Part 4: The yellow line and the three days of darkness
Part 6: The Kurier text

Aktueller denn je? / More relevant than ever?

„Жінка в Берліні“- щоденник жінки під час 1945 року, коли Німеччина капітулювала та радянська армія прийшла до Берліну. Вона описує вибухі, перебування в бідвалах, як жінок їх гвалтували ті „івани“ та знущались над ними. Книга сповнена болем та горес..читаючи цю книгу мені в голові не вкладалось „Як??? Як так, що пройшло більше ніж 70 років такого звірства та трагедії, яку начебто ніхто не забув і казали БІЛЬШЕ НІКОЛИ, моя країна в 2022 році має ті самі страждання,які люди пережили в 1945, бо до нас прийшли російськи загарбники, які хочуть знищити все наше квітуче українське, як і робили в 1945 в Німечинні….“.
(Julia Serenko)

Mir fällt auf, daß Eine Frau in Berlin eine ganz neue Aktualität gewonnen hat – zumindest wenn man sich die Buchrezensionen durchliest. Leser aus aller Welt ziehen direkte Parallelen von 1945 zu 2022. Und während ich die Dinge komplexer sehe, kann ich nicht abstreiten, daß viel Wahres daran ist. Auf diesen abgegriffenen Spruch „Wer aus der Geschichte nicht lernt, ist dazu verdammt, sie zu wiederholen“ würde ich hingegen gern verzichten. Zwar stimmt er, aber die Menschen haben seit tausenden von Jahren ihre Geschichte wiederholt. Warum? Weil sie immer nur auf äußere Formen achten und nie auf die unterliegenden Muster, die in Wahrheit für die ewige Wiederholung verantwortlich sind.
In jedem Fall würde ich der Aktualität wegen natürlich gern wieder einmal über Marta Hillers und/oder ihr Buch schreiben, aber mir fehlen die Ideen. Eine Zeitlang hatte ich sogar mit dem Gedanken gespielt, ein Video zu machen, denn auf YouTube findet man nichts Gehaltvolles zum Thema. Aber ehrlich gesagt schreckte mich die technische Seite ab. Ich habe keine Lust, mich in Videobearbeitung und all das einzuarbeiten. Falls also jemand meiner geschätzten Leser jemanden kennt, der das anders sieht – das Material liefere ich gerne! 🙂 Und auch Ideen für Blogbeiträge nehme ich gern entgegen.

It strikes me that A Woman in Berlin has taken on a whole new relevance – at least if you read through the book reviews. Readers from all over the world are drawing direct parallels from 1945 to 2022, and while I see things more complex, I can’t deny that there is a lot of truth in it. However, I would gladly dispense with that hackneyed saying „Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it“. Although it is true, people have been repeating their history for thousands of years. Why? Because they only ever pay attention to external forms and never to the underlying patterns that are in fact responsible for the eternal repetition.
In any case, for the sake of topicality, I would of course like to write about Marta Hillers and/or her book again, but I am short of ideas. For a while I even toyed with the idea of making a video, because you can’t find anything substantial on the subject on YouTube. But to be honest, the technical side put me off. I don’t feel like getting into video editing and all that. So if any of my esteemed readers know someone who sees it differently – I’ll gladly supply the material! 🙂 And I‘ m also happy to accept ideas for blog posts.

77 years have passed and it seemed that during this time mankind had to become better than it was; people had to learn to live without the mistakes of their ancestors, but as I see russian soldiers it did not affect, moreover, they became even more cruel and just inhuman. we can observe all this on today’s example of raped ukrainian women and not only women but also children and men.
This book, in my view, is now more than just a diary that describes the horrific days that german women went through during the Soviet occupation. unfortunately, in modern realities it also appears as a guide on how to stay alive during war, occupation and rape.
I was extremely impressed by the author, who turned out to be an intelligent, quick-witted, strong-spirited woman.
(Yana)

The Irlmaier prophecies, Part 4: The yellow line and the three days of darkness

(Quoted from: Stephan Berndt, Alois Irlmaier – Ein Mann sagt, was er sieht)

„Now I see the earth like a sphere before me, on which the lines of the planes stand out, now flying up from the sand like flocks of white doves.
The Russians run along in their three thrusts, they don’t stop anywhere, day and night they run as far as the Ruhr, where the many furnaces and chimneys are. But then the white doves come and it suddenly rains down all yellow from the sky. It will be a clear night when they start throwing. The tanks are still rolling, but the drivers are already dead. Where it falls, nothing lives any more, no man, no cattle, no tree, no grass, it turns withered and black. The houses are still standing. What it is, I don’t know and can’t say. It is a long line. Whoever crosses it, dies. From Prague it goes up to the big water at a bay. In that line, everything is gone. There, where it begins, is a city, a pile of stones. I must not say its name. After that I see that no one can cross it. Those who are here can no longer go back, those who are over there can no longer cross over. Then everything collapses for those here. No one can get back.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 91

„Then fly up the white birds, from the hot sand; so many that you can’t count them…“

Bayerische Landeszeitung, 22 October 1949, p. 7

„10,000 doves rise from the sand, fly overhead, but they don’t drop anything on us.“

Marcus Varena, Gesammelte Prophezeiungen, 1959, p. 183

„Then so many doves rise from the sand that I can’t count them. They fly over us, but you don’t have to be afraid, they don’t throw anything down here. … Then they fly north. In the middle there is a spot where nothing lives, no man, no cattle, no grass.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1950, p. 37

Never before seen large swarms of aviators roar across our Salzburg skies.

Am Vorabend der Finsternis, 1988, p. 111

The soil in West Germany is burnt 10 metres deep by a force. From the sands of the African desert the great birds rise with eggs of death without men.

Kurier-Text, 12 October 1945

„And I continue to see many large birds; some come from the east and others from the south. They fly over us [south-eastern Bavaria, i.e. to the north, note B.]. And where they drop something, that’s where it gets bad. They are just little boxes,“ Irlmeier described the size with his hands […], „but they are quite dangerous. It seems to me that there’s not much left alive where a box like that falls down. But,“ he looked at us, smiling and just like a man who has good news to announce, „there with us in the Saurüssl, nothing happens. We are lucky.“

Altbayerische Heimatpost, 20 November 1949, p. 8

The reporter of the Altbayerische Heimatpost explains:

In the vernacular, „Saurüssel“ is the name given to the piece of land cut out by the Inn and Salzach rivers and is bordered by mountains in the south.

In the course of a conversation, Irlmeier described the „black boxes“ and indicated the size as about 25 x 25 cm. „These are diabolical,“ he said, „when they explode, there is a yellow and green dust or smoke, what gets beneath is gone, whether it is human, animal or plant. People turn black and the flesh falls off their bones, the poison is so pungent.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1950, p. 54

„No worms will live on the ground, no grass will be left. I see the people lying there as the flesh falls from their bones. No one can go there for a year, they all die. From the Danube to the North Sea and the Baltic Sea is a horror. Many people are still dying, not of cholera, no, no, we just call it the black death.“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

„Do you know the Golden City?“ – „Yes, of course, Prague.“ – „You see, he knows it! And from there a wide strip stretches up to the sea, there everything is gone, no one can get across.“

Zukunft des Abendlandes, 1986, p. 186

„The Golden City is destroyed, that’s where it starts. Like a yellow line it goes up to the city in the bay.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 107

„From the Czech Republic up to the north it will become deserted, there it will rain down green and yellow, even the grass I see dying there…“

Tatsachenberichte um Alois Irlmaier, 1952, p. 21

In the last conversation with Irlmaier, which took place in the spring of 1959, the clairvoyant spoke of this phenomenon in detail. What he said is not concealed from the dear reader.
„Darkness will fall one day during the war. Then a hailstorm will break out with thunder and lightning and an earthquake will shake the earth.
Then do not go out of the house. The lights do not burn, except candlelight, the electricity stops. If you sniff the dust, you get a cramp and die. Don’t open the windows, cover them with black paper. All open water becomes poisonous and all open food that is not in sealed cans. No food in glass jars either, they won’t keep it out. Outside, the dust death is going around, a lot of people are dying. After 72 hours it will all be over again. But I say it again: don’t go out, don’t look out at the window, keep the consecrated candle or wax stick burning and pray. More people die overnight than in two world wars. …
Buy some soldered tins of rice and pulses. Bread and flour keep, moist things spoil, like meat, except in tin cans. Water from the tap is drinkable, but not milk. The people will not be very hungry during the catastrophe and darkness. The fire will burn, but don’t open a window during the 72 hours.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 108-110

„… but I advise you well: don’t open a window or a door for three days, then you will survive the difficult time. … After the great war comes mass death and famine, and then come the floods.“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

The deer fall, the grass turns yellow and dry, the dead people turn all yellow and black. The wind drives the clouds of death away to the east.

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 110

„Make sure you have enough newspaper. Go into the house and block the windows and doors with newspapers and hold newspapers in front of your faces. Do not go out of the house. Carry enough food home so that you have something to eat and don’t have to go out. It won’t take long, just a few days. You don’t need to buy houses and cars then, there is enough. Because everyone will say to the other, ‚Hey, are you still alive?'“

Zukunft des Abendlandes?, 1986, p. 186

„During or at the end of the war I will see the sign in the sky, the crucified one with the stigmata, and everyone will see it. I’ve seen it three times already, it’s coming for sure.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 93

„At this event I see a great cross in the sky and there will be an earthquake with thunder and lightning, so that everyone will be terrified and the whole world will cry out, ‚There is a God!'“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 108

„Then a higher being will sweep the course and help us in the war.“

Tatsachenberichte um Alois Irlmaier, 1952, p. 22

If one interprets Irlmaier’s „higher being“ as a star or comet, one has the appropriate explanation for the course: it is the orbit of the earth around the sun. The time is also fairly accurate: soon after Russia’s attack.

„When autumn comes, people gather in peace.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 94


Part 1: The seer
Part 2: The signs
Part 3: The Third World War
Part 5: The aftermath
Part 6: The Kurier text

The Irlmaier prophecies, Part 3: The Third World War

(Quoted from: Stephan Berndt, Alois Irlmaier – Ein Mann sagt, was er sieht)

When we asked him when the „great wash-up“ would take place, Irlmeier answered evasively at first, but then – and he did this in verse – he said, „when the leaves change colour“. – „It can be in autumn, it can be in spring. I just see white on the trees, but it can be flowers and it can be snow. It’s certainly not in summer.“

This is one of the more confused parts of the documentation. What is meant by the „great wash-up“? It could be the war or a great natural disaster […] or the three days of darkness towards the end of the war, or a kind of collective term for the sum of the catastrophes that then took place. If one studies the Irlmaier texts more closely, then in my opinion the most conclusive explanation is that Irlmaier means the three days of darkness towards the end of the war or three months after the beginning of the war.

„But I tell you again that it will not last long. And those who get through it are well off, for there is a long and happy time to come.“

Altbayerische Heimatpost, 20 November 1949, p. 8

The mountains have snow on top, but down below it’s aper (autumn country?). It looks yellow. I see an earthquake beforehand. The Korean War is over (this statement is from 7 December 1952. The author. [the Korean War ended in 1953])

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 92, Adlmaier zitiert Irlmaier

I mention this statement only for the sake of completeness. Because it is unclear before which event the earthquake should take place. Before the war? Furthermore, it is unclear where: an earthquake in Germany, or a major earthquake with a worldwide impact.

„Everything calls for peace, shalom! That’s when it happens. – A new Middle East war suddenly flares up, large fleet units face each other in the Mediterranean – the situation is tense. But the actual igniting spark is thrown into the powder keg in the Balkans: I see a great man fall; a bloody dagger lies next to him. Then everything is happening fast. Massed units of troops march into Belgrade from the east and advance towards Italy.“

PSI – und der dritte Weltkrieg, 1978, p. 63

According to the Irlmaier witness A. Pollinger (interview 2014), Irlmaier actually spoke specifically about a conflict with active Israeli participation:

„It starts with the Jews and the Arabs. That’s where it starts.“

Alois Irlmaier has repeatedly and in practically all early records commented on three political assassinations in the run-up to the „third world war“. The third assassination is supposed to be the signal for the outbreak of the great war. This is supposed to break out immediately afterwards.

Immediately after the [third] murder, you have to get to the Rhine as quickly as possible, along the left bank of the Rhine on the road to Basel, to Lindau across Lake Constance. The Russian won’t get to Lindau, but to Freiburg, no further. … He took a map of Germany, didn’t look at it when he spoke – I still remember today that I was startled – because he drew a straight line along the Rhine with his finger. That’s as far as he got, but no further than France.

Der Dritte Weltkrieg beginnt…, 1998, statement from 1956, p. 57-58

„Until the third murder of a high-ranking person happens, you have to run! Not on the autobahn, but backwards on the federal highways, the autobahns are all jammed. The Russian is coming.“

1956, witness Wostall aus Der 3. Weltkrieg beginnt…, 1998

In the case of the first two assassinations, it is not clear how long before assassination number three they are to take place. In fact, this ambiguity is so great that, in my opinion, one should only focus on the assassination immediately before the outbreak of war. Incidentally, such an assassination immediately before the war is predicted by other sources – e.g. a Bohemian refugee around 1944 (Bekh, Am Vorabend der Finsternis, p. 45).

When Irlmaier was asked in 1959, the year of his death, whether he still upheld his prediction of 1947, he replied: „It hasn’t changed in the slightest. It is only because it has come closer that I see it much more clearly. And the two men who killed the ‚third high-ranking man‘, I see them too. They were paid by other people. One of the killers is a short black man, the other is a little taller with a light complexion. I think it will be in the Balkans, but I can’t say for sure. … After the murder of the third one, it will start overnight.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, interview 1959, p. 106

The Bayerische Landeszeitung wrote in October 1949:

To the question, „When will this happen?“, the seer answers, „After the third murder!“ – „And where will that happen?“ We then hear something which leads us to suspect a Balkan city.

Bayerische Landeszeitung, 22 October 1949, p. 7

There will be another great war when the grain is ripe.

Münchner Merkur, 18 October 1949, p. 4

„When the beech trees in the Bavarian Forest turn red, that’s when it starts.“

Zukunft des Abendlandes?, 1986, p. 185

„The ears of corn,“ I hear Irlmaier describe, „are standing high on stalks. The leaves on the trees are already beginning to brown. Then the third murder happens. … After the third murder it starts! … The whole country between the Danube and the Rhine is enveloped in smoke. In three armoured wedges they attack, from east to west, from Berlin to the Bohemian valley.“

Nach der Sintflut, 1986, statement from probably end of 1948, p. 163-164

„It starts overnight, then they come in, all black, over the forest [Bavarian Forest, note B.]. They come so quickly that the peasants are sitting together at the innkeeper’s table, and the foreign soldiers are already peering in at the doors and windows. It’s not easy for anyone to get away, but everything passes so quickly that you can hardly believe it.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 90

In one day, he said, the Russians would advance as far as the Ruhr. Everything north of the Danube would be killed, and only those with fast vehicles would be able to cross the river, so unexpectedly would the war break out.

Echo der Woche, 12 May 1950, p. 7

If we have heard and understood correctly, there is talk of three great army columns, whose tanks can be heard grinding and thundering far and wide, advancing in a flash from the East to the Rhine without finding any resistance at all.

Bayerische Landeszeitung, 22 October 1949, p. 7

„The time is near. I see three attack thrusts flooding in. The lower army column comes along over the forest, but then pulls up northwest of the Danube. The line is roughly Prague, Bavarian Forest and northwest. The blue water (Danube, note Adlmaier) is the southern border. The second thrust goes from east to west across Saxony, the third from north-east to south-west. Now I see the earth like a sphere before me, on which the lines of the planes stand out, now flying up from the sand like flocks of white doves.
The Russians run along in their three thrusts, they don’t stop anywhere, day and night they run as far as the Ruhr, where the many furnaces and chimneys are. But then the white doves come and it suddenly rains down all yellow from the sky. It will be a clear night when they start throwing. The tanks are still rolling, but the drivers are already dead. Where it falls, nothing lives any more, no man, no cattle, no tree, no grass, it turns withered and black. The houses are still standing. What it is, I don’t know and can’t say. It is a long line. Whoever crosses it, dies. From Prague it goes up to the big water at a bay. In that line, everything is gone.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 90-91

„From the Golden City [Prague, note B.] it goes out. The first column goes from the blue water northwest to the Swiss border.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 107

The enemy does not cross the Danube, but turns northwest; Irlmaier sees their headquarters in the Naab valley in the Upper Palatinate. The town of Landau an der Isar suffers badly from a stray bomb.

Alois Irlmaier, 1990, p. 129

„From K., the tongues of fire fly immeasurably far to the northwest, to the west and to the south. I see them like comet tails. But we have nothing to fear. Only once does a tongue go short and then a small town burns down, but that is north of the Saurüssel.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1 February 1950, p. 54

„Three great armies I see advancing in wide pincers to the Ruhr.“

Tatsachenberichte um Alois Irlmaier, 1952, p. 21

For the Speyer area, we know that it is supposed to start between 0.00 and 2.00 on Friday night. To a woman from Hockenheim he said:

„You have to sit on packed suitcases, when you hear it (on the radio) you still have 20 minutes to get over the bridge (Rhine bridge in Speyer), after that it is too late.“

Letter to the editor, 19 March 1998, private archive Berndt

„From the east, it’s just teeming with caterpillars [military columns, note B.], one almost squeezes the other, there are so many of them.“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5

The Russian is coming:
a) the Ostmarkstrasse – Regensburg – Nuremberg – Stuttgart – Karlsruhe approx. 5 divisions
b) the Autobahn to Frankfurt from Saxony 15 divisions
c) Berlin – Hanover – Hamburg motorway … the Russians won’t get to Lindau, but as far as Freiburg, no further.

Heinrich Bauer, 1998, p. 57-58, Der 3. Weltkrieg beginnt am Abend des 22. August 1998

„There is no more bridge over the Danube until Regensburg…“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 107

„I don’t see any Danube bridges above Regensburg anymore.“

PSI – und der dritte Weltkrieg, 1972, p. 63

„On the right-hand side of the Rhine, everything is destroyed. It’s going to be a terrible thing.“

Zukunft des Abendlandes?, 1986, p. 186

„Hardly anything remains of the great Frankfurt. The Rhine valley will be devastated, mainly from the air.“

PSI – und der dritte Weltkrieg, 1972, p. 63

„Due to a natural disaster or something similar, the Russians suddenly move north. The final battle breaks out around Cologne.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 110

At Aachen is the greatest battle in the history of the world.

Kurier-Text, 1945 [More on that in Part 5 of this blog series]

„One thing I know for sure […], when the war comes, it bites out most in the north. I see a big water that’s higher than a house, that floods the banks, and whoever it catches won’t get away alive. It’s very quick, it doesn’t take long.“

Altbayerische Heimatpost, 20 November 1949

The following prophecy text is taken from a small 24-page booklet entitled Tatsachenberichte um Alois Irlmaier, which a certain Ernst Ladurner from the Allgäu region published on his own initiative in about 1952. The booklet contains no copyright notice and no date. Judging by its contents, it was published after 22 June 1951.

„People always think that everything has to turn out the way they want it to. But I can see very clearly that a new war will come over us. First they’ll kill the third, another high-ranking person. They’ve already killed two. Over there he’ll die where the sun rises, and then it will break out overnight. The war will be cruel.“

„I see three large army platoons advancing in wide pincers as far as the Ruhr area. Over the big water over there [North America, note B.] the Russian will come, too. From the Czech Republic up to the north the land will become deserted, there it will fall green and yellow, even the grass I see dying there. Not a worm, not a shrub, not a tree will remain, they will destroy everything, the great white doves. None of the three armies [of the Russians, note B.] will see their homeland again. But we have nothing to fear, for the land between Untersberg and Wendelstein will remain protected by the holy image of grace in Altötting.“

The second sentence refers to Eastern troops invading the USA via Alaska. This is likely to be a large-scale relief attack to tie up American forces on their home continent.

„There will be another great war when the grain is ripe. Unfortunately, I cannot say the year. The whole area east of Linz will become a single desert, but here in the south and west there is nothing to fear. This war will only last four months, but it will be the most terrible in the history of the world. Budapest and Prague will be destroyed in the process. In this struggle weapons will be used, that tanks will still roll on when the men sitting in them are already dead…“

Münchner Merkur, 18 October 1949, p. 4

At this point we interrupted Irlmaier with the question whether, in his view, only this area of Bavaria would be spared.
„Well, you don’t have to worry over there in the Allgäu and on the Lech. It won’t do you much harm either, only large numbers of refugees will come and their own people will steal and loot so much it will be a disgrace.“
Irlmaier also knew the answer to our second question, whether he believed that religious places of grace would have a generally protective effect in the next war:
„I can say that for sure: all people who live around a holy place will be spared, not a hair will be touched, heaven will see to that. They told me that there is also a large pilgrimage church over there in the Pfaffenwinkel between Lech and Ammer, where people pray to the scourged Lord. Nothing happens there. Only refugees will come …“
„The war won’t last long, but it will still be enough. In one and a half moonlengths the people will have the first horror behind them.“

One and a half moonlengths – that would be six weeks. From then on, the Russians should be in retreat and the West’s victory should gradually become apparent.

„The Yank will master the other (will win, note Ladurner) and then we will have a free hand again in our homeland. Golden times will come to us. I can clearly see three crowns that will rule in the fear of God. We will have the Danube Monarchy. All over again it will start and people will live again in reverence and trust in God, as it should be.“

„But I see someone flying from the east, he throws something into the big water, then something strange happens. The water rises like a tower and falls down again, then everything is flooded.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1950, p. 37

„The countries by the sea are seriously endangered by the water, the sea is very turbulent, the waves are as high as houses, it foams as if it were boiling underground. Islands disappear and the climate changes. Part of the proud island sinks when the thing falls into the sea that the plane throws. Then the water rises like a solid piece and falls back again. What that is, I don’t know.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1955, p. 93

Recently, Irlmeier confirms a bitter fate for three large cities. „One city sinks into the water, the second big city stands steeple-deep in the sea, but the third collapses.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1950, p. 54

Between the continent and the island, Irlmeier sees a column of water shooting towards the sky. It combines with the clouds to form a raging, all-darkening hurricane. The curtain of rain tears open and: „The great city on the island has sunk into the sea. Off the coast of the continent lies new land.“

Nach der Sintflut, 1986, p. 164

„The islands off the coast are sinking because the water is all wild. I see big holes in the sea, and then they close up again when the huge big waves come back.“

Blick in die Zukunft, 1961, p. 111

„I see a large island around England going down too. I can’t tell you what it’s called, but I see it well.“

Landshuter Zeitung, 12 April 1950, p. 5


Not actually in Stephan Berndt’s book but in an older one:

When asked how long this war would last, Irlmaier replied:
„I clearly see a three, but whether it’s three days, three weeks or three months, I don’t know. On the Rhine I see a half moon that wants to swallow everything. The horns of the crescent want to close. What that means, I don’t know.“

Wolfgang Johannes Bekh: Alois Irlmaier – Der Brunnenbauer von Freilassing


Part 1: The seer
Part 2: The signs
Part 4: The yellow line and the three days of darkness
Part 5: The aftermath
Part 6: The Kurier text